Cisco And …Business, Sustainability And Diversity

One of the things that caught my eye this month was that Cisco ranked 1st in Barron’s sustainability study. They ranked 3rd in Corporate Knights’ similar ranking announced in 2017, they dropped to 7th in 2018 but still are the top ranked US company in that world ranking. It is also fascinating that while Barron’s report had several tech companies in the top 10, Corporate Knights was far more diverse and, other than Cisco being in the top 10 in both, there was little additional correlation between the reports. One reason for this is that the Corporate Knights report looks at companies internationally, but Barron’s only looks at the US, but even taking that into account, it is fascinating that only Cisco, as a tech company ranked highly in both reports. What I also think is fascinating is that both reports look at far more than what we normally group under sustainability. In both cases the judging organizations also look at diversity, management competence and performance, and other items that we more normally connect with good governance than we typically connect with sustainability. But, I think, this approach is right because sustainability makes no real sense if the company is poorly run, inefficient or unlikely to survive. Sustainability should not only mean strong ecological focus and execution, but strong execution in general operations because, if the firm doesn’t survive then neither will their environmental efforts. More importantly, firms emulate other successful firms, and being both successful and good for the environment should create a multiplicative impact on the market as other firms emulate Cisco for economic benefit. The message is that Cisco isn’t successful despite their sustainability and diversity focus, but because of it. Let’s look at a couple interesting aspects of Cisco’s focus and recognition. To read the complete article, CLICK HERE NOTE: This column was originally published in the Pund-IT...

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The Dell/EMC Personalities Merge With VMware Gambit

Dell Technologies fascinate me largely because it is a very large merger that was not a near total disaster, in fact it was surprisingly well done largely because the two firms threw out the rule book. What fascinates me most is that that rather than being emulated by other firms, those firms seemed to look at Dell’s success, ignore it, and then went back to the flawed way of doing things. One thing I have been anticipating is a blending of strategic thinking between the firms. Dell seemed more creative and agile than EMC, but EMC seemed to be able to think out of the box, particularly when it came to customer care and organizational structure, better than Dell. But the idea that was floated in January that Dell Technologies would be acquired by VMware as a path to taking the joint firms public again reflects on the strengths of both firms. Whether it happens or not I think this is a very interesting development and one I also expect Dell’s competitors to ignore much like firms have ignored how Steve Jobs made Apple the most valuable company in the world. Let us talk about the VMware Gambit this week. To read the complete article, CLICK HERE NOTE: This column was originally published in the Pund-IT...

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IBM’s… Back to Kicking Butt

I’m ex-IBM myself and it gives me great pleasure to see my old firm do well. Well this quarter they didn’t disappoint with significant improvement in their new business initiatives, which are just short of 50 percent of revenue. You remember the mainframe, that platform that supposedly was dead back in the 1980s? Well, once again IBM showcased there is evidently life after death because that puppy grew more than a whopping 70 percent year over year. Let’s talk about IBM’s results and why IBM, after 100 years, is again able to perform at the top of their class. To read the complete article, CLICK HERE NOTE: This column was originally published in the Pund-IT...

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AMD Amps Up With Radeon Software Adrenalin Edition

AMD is executing amazingly well now in sharp contrast to the way they were a decade ago (and given Intel has had to discontinue their mobile, wearable, and maker efforts they seem to be out executing Intel as well now). One of the areas the firm has significantly enhanced is software and this is showcased by the release of the Adrenalin Edition of their GPU software suite. Increasingly only part of the gaming experience is assured by hardware, to get the most out of that hardware the control software that surrounds it must step in and do its part. I guess the analogy would be in a current race car where the telematics and software are increasingly providing the edge because the physical parts of the car are so tightly regulated and approaching theoretical performance limits. No regulations here, but we are getting amazing amounts of potential performance out of the current generation of graphics cards and making sure you get every ounce is the purpose of this free bundled offering from AMD. Let’s talk about some of the enhancements. To read the complete article, CLICK HERE NOTE: This column was originally published in the Pund-IT...

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Robotics: Is NVIDIA…That Truly Thinks Strategically?

Around a decade ago virtually all the tech companies, seeing Apple’s success with the iPhone and Google’s response with Android, were convinced the future was in mobile phones and almost everyone was wrong. NVIDIA, however, pivoted early shifting massive resources to autonomous cars and ended up becoming one of the few firms that wasn’t badly damaged by a failed mobile strategy. They have since been followed into this area by others, but Autonomous cars are just the tip of the iceberg, this same technology can be used in autonomous aircraft and robots. While other firms also have drone efforts, NVIDIA was the first to see the connection between the drones and cars and bridge the efforts so that both benefitted from what the other did. However, with robotics, it seemed that tech firms in general didn’t even think that this was a category they were remotely interested in even though it is likely at some point each of us eventually get one. Once again NVIDIA stood up this week with partner to create the software needed for these robots which are also connected to their autonomous car and aircraft efforts and all should benefit from this inclusive strategy. But it strikes me that NVIDIA is the only US tech firm that seems to be aggressively looking at where the tech market is going next and getting ahead of the curve as opposed to what others seem to be doing and following a peer’s lead into a new market. Let’s talk about that this week. To read the complete article, CLICK HERE NOTE: This column was originally published in the Pund-IT...

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