Does Avni SDC Score Twice With Citrix?
Sep25

Does Avni SDC Score Twice With Citrix?

Recent startup Avni, which is pushing its Software-Defined Cloud concept, has just announced a product integration with NetScaler, the popular Citrix application delivery controller. The deal looks even better for Avni with the news surfacing that Citrix is looking for a quick sale, whole or in part, and possibly to Dell. Analyst Zeus Kerravala, ZK Research, reported back in February that he had come across Avni, who was apparently “talking about cloud virtualization, which brings many benefits, such as seamless application roll-outs across any cloud and application portability across disparate clouds.” This was prior to a formal briefing, but he noted that if Avni can build a product that transforms a customer’s data centers to software defined cloud, “a company could deploy applications, compute and network services almost instantaneously, or “at cloud speed.” Avni unveiled SDC 2.0 back in April, quickly followed by the announcement it had validated its platform against key IT requirements as governed by the Open Networking User Group (May), and that it was joining HP Networking’s SDN Ecosystem (August). The integration of our SDC – “a full-featured platform that includes app services, software-defined network services, 3D analytics, policy automation, and cloud virtualization” – with Citrix’s NetScaler ADC allows us to overcome the bottlenecks that once drove down the performance and elasticity of individual apps in a large-scale cloud environment, said Avni founder and CEO Rohini Kasturi, in a prepared statement. In a conversation with IT Trends & Analysis, Kasturi said the Citrix and HP partnerships were just the first of many that will be announced this year. He said Avni came out of stealth 4-5 months ago and has done a number of deployments, and has a “huge pipeline” of companies, especially large financial companies, media companies. “By the end of the year you’ll see a lot more buzz from Avni.” The company is working on a lot of partnerships, he said, especially with cloud service providers. “The CSP is the big enabler.” Avni addresses two of the biggest pain points of moving to the cloud: getting applications up and running quickly, and the ability to move those applications easily from cloud to cloud. SDC gives companies the freedom to move to an alternative cloud infrastructure in record time and without impact on CapEx or OpEx, said Kasturi in an earlier statement. “What software-defined networking did for legacy networks, we’ve successfully done for the cloud.” Over half (53%) of organizations expect cloud to drive increased revenue over the next two years, according to a new Cisco survey. Moving to the cloud can deliver an average of $1.6 million in additional revenue per application deployed on private...

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Significant Churn Forecast For EFSS Market
Sep10

Significant Churn Forecast For EFSS Market

A lot of enterprises will be shopping for electronic file sync and share capabilities in the near future, according to a new survey from Connected Data. Even better – from the perspective of the ‘leading provider of private cloud file, sync and share appliances (Transporter) designed to combine the simplicity of public cloud file sharing solutions with the performance and security of an on-premise appliance’ – the overwhelming majority of these prospective EFSS customers don’t seem to trust outside service providers. The Santa Clara-based company, with more than 40,000 Transporter users managing more than 24 Petabytes of storage, just reported that over 33% of surveyed enterprises (1,000-plus employees) plan to adopt a new EFSS solution in the next 12 months. This group consists of companies that will be switching systems (21%) and those that plan to adopt their first EFSS (12.6%). While the customer dissatisfaction – “with public cloud around security and privacy” – was a pleasant surprise, it was a surprise, said Geraldine Osman, VP of International Marketing, Connected Data. She told IT Trends & Analysis that the company, which started up in 2011, wanted to see where the EFSS market is, discovering that most of the market wanted to move in its direction was a nice bonus. Gartner defines EFSS as a range of on-premises or cloud-based capabilities that enables individuals to synchronize and share documents, photos, videos and files across mobile devices, such as smartphones, tablets and PCs. Released a couple of weeks ago, its Magic Quadrant for Enterprise File Synchronization and Sharing categorized 16 vendors as: Leaders (Syncplicity, Citrix, Box and Accellion); Challengers (Google, Microsoft and Dropbox; Visionaries (Egnyte and WatchDox by BlackBerry); and Niche Players: (7 companies, including AirWatch by VMware, Huddle and Acronis). It also referenced another 48 vendors who didn’t meet the criteria, and none of whom were Connected Data. The 64 vendors referenced in the GMQ are just the tip of the iceberg: the EFSS market has grown rapidly since 2010, with more than 140 players originating from a variety of markets and technology backgrounds having different approaches and business models. ‘Destination vendors focus on EFSS, adding complementary content collaboration features for users and back-end integrations with IT systems. Extension vendors belong to adjacent markets, such as collaboration, enterprise content management (ECM), managed file transfer (MFT), storage, backup, virtual workspaces and enterprise mobility management (EMM).’ Gartner said EFSS has become a priority for organizations to enable a modern, digital workplace for employees, partners and even clients. With such a crowded market, competition is ‘getting fierce’ among destination vendors, which are under pressure by: (1) cloud storage “gorillas,” such as Microsoft, Google,...

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VMware… Bonneville: Containing the Container Contagion?

Containers, Docker, Kubernetes. What do all of these things have in common? From VMware’s perspective, they represent an existential threat to their hypervisor world order. Enter “Project Bonneville” – a VMware initiative to maintain the vSphere order of things by intertwining the roles of containers and VMs on server infrastructure. To read the complete article, CLICK...

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The Business Case for “Stick” Computing

Recent announcements suggest that “stick” computing may finally be gaining broader momentum: Google and ASUS announced what will be called the Chromebit, a USB drive-style device described as a full computer “smaller than a candy bar… that will be available for less than $100. By simply plugging this device into any display, you can turn it into a computer.” Availability is targeted for this summer. Meanwhile, reports noted that the Intel Ultra-Slim Compute Stick announced in January at CES 2015 is available for order at Newegg and other online sources with either Windows 8.1 (for $150) or Ubuntu Linux 14.04 (for $110) preloaded. The Stick is Android-based and enabling Windows requires an activation fee. The Intel Compute Stick is somewhat similar in form and features to Dell’s Wyse Cloud Connect, which was launched in January 2014. Both connect to displays via HDMI/HML ports and offer mini-USB ports for external power sources. Both contain a CPU, RAM and Flash storage capable of supporting essential computing tasks, as well as a Micro SD slot for adding storage capacity. Both include 802.11b/g/n and Bluetooth 4.0 for wireless connectivity, as well as a USB 2.0 input for connecting other devices. To read the complete article, CLICK HERE NOTE: This column was originally published in the Pund-IT...

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OpenPOWER Foundation Progress Report from GTC 2015

Last October, I wrote a report on the progress of the OpenPOWER Foundation, an organization dedicated to expanding the ecosystem that surrounds IBM’s POWER8 and future generations of POWER processors. In that report I described IBM’s plan to make processor specifications, firmware and related software available to the evolving OpenPOWER community – essentially making POWER an open standard microprocessor. I also described the rapid growth taking place in the OpenPOWER ecosystem. Since its founding in late 2013 by IBM, Google, NVIDIA, Tyan and Mellanox, OpenPOWER has grown to over 110 member organizations. Last week I attended the first annual OpenPOWER Summit (in San Jose, California) which was organized as part of NVIDIA’s GTC 2015 conference and learned that OpenPOWER Foundation members are delivering several new POWER8-based platforms, and supporting IBM’s CAPI and field programmable gate array (FPGA) adapters. To read the complete article, CLICK HERE NOTE: This column was originally published in the Pund-IT...

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