SD-WAN Wars: VEP-ons of Mass Attraction?
Mar22

SD-WAN Wars: VEP-ons of Mass Attraction?

Enterprise-networking-powerhouse-wannabe Dell (Technologies) EMC, which held the bottom position in an almost-recent top-10 vendor list (although VMware was in 6th place, behind first-place Cisco, and the pretenders to its throne such as HPE/Aruba, Juniper, and Huawei), is looking to make a big splash in the SD-WAN (software-defined wide-area network) puddle with its Virtual Edge Platform family. According to the company, which claims to already serve 98% of the Fortune 500, the new platform family and software bundles enhance SD-WAN to speed digital transformation, and is the first product to use Intel’s D-2100 processor, and the features validated and tested solutions with Silver Peak, VeloCloud and Versa software to simplify and accelerate deployments. The VEP4600, which will start at $1,500, will begin shipping worldwide on April 24. A subset of software-defined networking (SDN) — i.e. technology versus architecture — SD-WAN represents a small fraction of the overall networking market (~5%) but is growing at 59% annually and is expected to be worth $1.3 billion by 2020 (Gartner). 451 Research is a little more pessimistic, putting the market at $1.5 billion by 2021, while IDC is more optimistic — a compound annual growth rate (CAGR) of 69.6% and $8.05 billion by 2021. The 4Q17 SD-WAN market was valued at $147 million, with CY17 up 3.9x over CY16. VeloCloud (acquired by VMware acquired by Dell) was the top vendor with 19% share, followed by Aryaka (17%) and Silver Peak (12%). “Reviewing recent wins, we can see a market that is maturing with a transition from early market adopters to mainstream buyers. Other signs of maturation include expansions at existing clients and incremental product offerings such as security and WAN optimization on top of basic WAN transport virtualization,” said Cliff Grossner, Ph.D., Senior Research Director and Advisor for the Cloud and Data Center Research Practice at IHS Markit. Great growth projections, but on a really small base, when you consider that the overall network market was worth $51 billion last year, and Cisco held 54.3% of it. Dell Technologies, the parent of Dell EMC, lumps networking with its much-larger server business, and in its most recent quarter, 3QFY18, reported overall revenue of $19.6 billion, while the networking/server tandem came in at $3.9 billion, an increase of 32% year over year and 3% quarter over quarter. Still, the SD-WAN market — which Dell has the largest share — is hot, driven by the need to to increase security and reduce appliance sprawl, with 93% of recent survey respondents planning to implement the technology by the end of 2019. It’s a little premature to call it a family yet, Jeff Baher, Senior Director of Product...

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Is Intel Melting Down? Hardly.

Hang around high-tech, or any other industry long enough and you learn that headline-worthy bad news comes in mostly predictable flavors. There’s good old executive malfeasance, often complicated by breathtaking greed and/or egotism. Plus, don’t forget what might be called Stupid Employee Tricks which can range from simple misadventures to cluelessly earnest activities whose idiocy or sociopathology is utterly lost to those involved. To be fair, not all negative headlines are internally-created, so be sure to mention shady activities by associates, like contractors and partners. Then there’s faulty/broken technology news. It’s difficult to speak of these events generally since they can range from marginal quality or manufacturing issues to catastrophic device failures. But despite their scope, what happens and how issues are corrected can get to the very soul of a company. Why so? Because since those processes are often also controlled by executive fiat and board-level decision making, their impact on a company’s brand and core strategies can linger for months or years. However, in best case scenarios, direct, intelligent action can help resolve the problems far more quickly and effectively than might be expected. That brings us to the current situation with Intel and the design points reported early in January that make many of its chips susceptible to security exploits called “Meltdown” and “Spectre.” To read the complete article, CLICK HERE NOTE: This column was originally published in the Pund-IT...

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Intel + AMD = Mobile Gaming (and Other) Innovations

Mobile innovation impacts IT products of every sort. That’s certainly true for consumer endpoints, but it’s also the case for a widening range of business solutions and services. However, there are a few areas where inherent design issues inhibit device OEMs from developing compelling mobile solutions. One area where this is particularly thorny is in gaming laptops where the necessary footprint for CPU and GPU components contributes to systems that average 26mm (over 1”) in height, or more than twice the 11mm to 16mm heights common in thin and light laptops. That substantial difference isn’t just an aesthetic issue—it also results in gaming systems being considerably heavier than most consumer and business laptops. That’s a problem that Intel and AMD are working together to fix. To read the complete article, CLICK HERE NOTE: This column was originally published in the Pund-IT...

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Intel, IoT and the Next Phase of…

The decided shift toward industrial IoT over the past 12-18 months is hardly surprising since the value of IoT to and investment capacity of businesses makes them attractive prospects to vendors. But there are problems ahead in IoT, especially in terms of efficiently scaling and speeding IoT deployments while securing customers’ networks and other resources. Those challenges have seemed nearly insurmountable, especially if estimates of the IoT markets scaling to tens of billions of connected devices by 2020 are to be believed. That goal is clearly what Intel aims to help customers and partners achieve with its automated Secure Device Onboard Zero Touch model and Enhanced Privacy ID security features. Thanks to Intel, the future of industrial IoT just got a whole lot brighter. To read the complete article, CLICK HERE NOTE: This column was originally published in the Pund-IT...

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Intel/Waymo/AI.. Autonomous Car Dominance

Autonomous cars likely represent of the biggest potential technology waves since the Smartphone. This is because, to function properly, they’ll not only have to carry some of the most powerful computers ever created, they also will have to have a network that is even more ubiquitous than the cellular network, and have a secure management overlay that would dwarf that of Nuclear Power plants. And, right behind autonomous cars and trucks, we have autonomous flying drones coming some of which will replace these autonomous cars which aren’t yet in market. For more information, CLICK HERE NOTE: This column was originally published in the Pund-IT...

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