CA’s BTCS2.1: Where Do We GrOw From Here?
Jun14

CA’s BTCS2.1: Where Do We GrOw From Here?

At last week’s second annual Built to Change Summit CA Technologies updated analysts and journalists on where it and the markets it’s pursuing — primarily DevSecOps, with a heaping helping of mainframe — are, where they’re going, and how the software toolmaker will grab a bigger slice of the rapidly growing digital transformation (DT) pie, which is being largely driven by software, and more specifically, applications. While the money being lavished on DT and DevSecOps are staggering, CA’s ability to grow with this opportunity remains at best a work in progress, with relatively flat sales and forecasts. Based on the market data, CA should be in the DT/DevSecOps sweet spot, and poised for rapid and sustainable growth. According to a new report, IDC’s forecast for the global DevOps software market — in excess of $5.6 billion by 2021 — was way off. MarketsandMarkets predicts that CA’s future has a much bigger potential upside — $10.31 billion by 2023 — up from $3.42 billion in 2018. Even better for CA, the market growth will be powered ‘due to the increase in the adoption rate of Artificial Intelligence (AI) and machine learning among enterprises.’ So all that remains to be seen is if CA can continue to grow with the software-enabled, data-driven, digital transformation business phenomenon that will run on DevSecOps, while reducing, if not eliminating, the shackles of its legacy businesses and embraces software-as-a-service and more flexible pay-as-you-go consumption models. It faces many competitors — including IBM, Micro Focus (HPE), Puppet, Red Hat, Microsoft and Chef Software — and must continue to innovate at speed, and execute with precision and agility. That’s a lot to ask, but for a company that’s been around since 1976, probably not too much. Automation, AI and ML were front and center at BTCS 2, and while the company didn’t coin this phrase — “Software is eating the world but AI is eating software” — it was critical to the company’s future, said Ashok Reddy, Group GM, DevOps. He and other company execs, made it clear that artificial intelligence and machine learning were being aggressively pursured in a multitude of initiatives and products. Just prior to the summit, CA’s CTO and EVP Otto Berkes said there is “massive potential” to apply machine learning and machine intelligence. amd that the company has some “very pragmatic solutions” already in the market, and is doing a “lot of experimentation” on machine learning and machine intelligence. They figured prominently in last weeks product initiatives, as well as a number of its boundary-stretching initiatives, i.e. CA Accelerator, its internal fail-fast venture-capital program, and its Strategic Research intiative, under which a...

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DTW18 & Connecting The DoTs (Part 3 of 3)

LAS VEGAS: Of all the leading IT vendors, Dell has done the best job of ‘keeping it simple’, and ruthlessly embracing that mantra in everything it does, and the product launches at last week’s Dell Technologies World 2018 were no exception. Given its major brands — Dell, Dell EMC, Pivotal, RSA, SecureWorks, Virtustream, and VMware — and leadership in 22 product categories, the opportunity was there to release a flood of new and enhanced products and services, but KISS prevailed. Here’s the abbreviated version of the product — and company — news just announced by Dell Technologies: –Dell Technologies Capital emerged from stealth, and announced that it has completed 24 investments in the last year, with one third of new investments focused on AI/ML and the remaining focused on security, next-gen infrastructure and developer ecosystem, including DocuSign, MongoDB and Zscaler; -updated VDI portfolio includes adding the Dell EMC PowerEdge 14th generation infrastructure and simplified configuration options to the Dell EMC VDI Complete Solutions, and the Dell Wyse 5070 thin client, the company’s most versatile and scalable thin client platform; -AI (artificial intelligence) and ML (machine learning) initiatives, including expanding the Dell EMC PowerEdge server portfolio to accelerate AI-driven workloads, analytics, deployment and efficiency, deeper relationships with Intel, and Dell Precision Optimizer 5.0 enhanced with machine learning algorithms, intelligently tunes the speed and productivity of Dell Precision workstations; -additions to the Hyper-Converged Infrastructure portfolio, including a simplified path to VMware-based clouds, and enhancements to VxRail and VxRack SDDC; –Dell EMC PowerMax, engineered with end-to-end NVMe, ready for Storage Class Memory (SCM) and NVMe over Fabrics, making it the world’s fastest storage array built for mission-critical applications of today and tomorrow, as well as Dell EMC VxBlock System 1000 support for end-to-end NVMe with PowerMax, native replication and a new entry point X-Brick system Dell EMC XtremIO, and a sneak peak at Dell EMC PowerEdge MX infrastructure, which is scheduled to be released later this year; -collaboration with Microsoft to build a secure, intelligent edge-to-cloud IoT solution featuring Dell Edge Gateways, VMware Pulse IoT Center and Microsoft Azure IoT Edge; and, -the next generation of Virtustream Viewtrust, its risk management and continuous compliance monitoring solution that offers enhanced scalability, performance, and serviceability to enterprises and public sector organizations with new SaaS capabilities. For more information on DTW18, check out Connecting The DoTs Part 1-Dell and digital transformation and Part 2-analysts’ insights. DISCLAIMER: I hold shares in many of the companies referenced in this article, and Dell looked after airfare and hotel while I was at Dell Technologies World....

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Dell EMC, Microsoft and the Key Importance of IoT…

The direction of the tech industry’s brightest spotlights tends to be fickle. That’s no surprise since they’re often operated by marketing departments more interested in claiming stylistic innovation than delivering substantial value. But it doesn’t mean that real work and progress aren’t being accomplished. That’s certainly true in the case of Internet of Things (IoT) technologies, especially those focusing on vertical-specific scenarios and use cases. Sometimes called Industrial Internet of Things (IIoT) solutions, these offerings are typically designed to simplify and streamline functions that are common in certain kinds of workplaces, like factories and manufacturing facilities and those unique to specific verticals and sectors, including agriculture, automotive, oil/gas and pharmaceuticals. To read the complete article, CLICK HERE NOTE: This column was originally published in the Pund-IT...

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Intel.. Taking Security to the Silicon Level

When it comes to digital security, the past year or so has delivered multiple lessons with a single conclusion: that whatever people, including individual consumers to business organizations to the IT vendors who serve them, have done or are doing regarding IT security, it isn’t enough. Taken in total, the situation may appear hopeless, but it sets the scene for the new silicon-level security technologies and initiatives that Intel announced this week at the RSA 2018 conference. The problem(s) with security The problems dominating security are two-fold. First, computing endpoints, systems and networks have become so complex that the industry’s decades-long approach of building/promoting numerous individual specialty solutions is at the breaking point in terms of working properly and meeting clients’ needs. Customers themselves bear at least part of the blame for these failures. Not only are most unwilling to learn or do what’s necessary to secure their devices against cybercriminals and exploits, but they also expect those products to work without any impact on performance and functionality. That can be a fatal combination, at least when it comes to protecting identity, financial and other assets. The other problem is that the cyberthreat landscape is growing exponentially. The situation is no longer limited to the prototypical evil hackers long-beloved by the mainstream media and entertainment industries. End users also need to worry about having valuable digital information “mined” or otherwise ripped-off by a variety of well-organized and financed cybercriminals and gangs, state-sponsored espionage rings and corporate thieves. And let’s not forget supposedly trustworthy organizations, like social media players that sell their users’ data with little care or oversight until they get caught. Facebook is currently sweating the spotlight, but it’s not like the company is any kind of “lone gunman” in this regard. Plus, there are bumblers like Equifax and other massive credit and finance companies whose efforts to secure consumer data are, to put it mildly, as deeply careless as they are dumbly clueless. To read the complete article, CLICK HERE NOTE: This column was originally published in the Pund-IT...

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HCI: A Cure For IT Complexity?
Feb08

HCI: A Cure For IT Complexity?

All-in-one computing, or IT in a box, is experiencing huge growth under the hyperconverged infrastructure (HCI) label, but while it has quickly moved from hype to mainstream, it still has a long way to go before the software-centric architecture – that integrates compute, storage and virtualization resources in a single system, typically x86 hardware – becomes the preferred way to build your IT infrastructure. HCI first showed up on the Gartner Hype Cycle in 2015, paired with Integrated Systems and taking its initial step of its Hype journey, Innovation Trigger, with the expectation of reaching the Plateau of Productivity in 5-10 years. Just a year later, in Gartner 2016 Hype Cycle For Storage Technologies, HCI was poised atop the very Peak of Inflated Expectations, with an estimated mainstream adoption of less than two years. On Tuesday Gartner released its inaugural Magic Quadrant for Hyperconverged Infrastructure, which placed Nutanix, along with Dell EMC, VMware and HPE in its Leaders category. Honorable mentions went to: Cisco, Huawei and Pivot3 (Challengers); Stratoscale and Microsoft (Visionaries); and Scale Computing, DataCore and HTBase (Niche Players). The research giant predicts that by 2020, 20% of business-critical applications currently deployed on three-tier IT infrastructure will transition to hyperconverged infrastructure. According to the latest numbers from IDC, converged systems market revenue increased 10.8% year over year to $2.99 billion during the third quarter of 2017 (3Q17), but hyperconverged systems sales grew 68.0% YoY to $1 billion (33.5% for the total market). Dell was the HCI leader – $306.8 million in revenue and a 30.6% share – followed by Nutanix in second place, with $207.4 million in revenue and a share of 20.7%. IDC’s list of key players included Atlantis Computing, Cisco, Fujitsu, Gridstore, HPE, SimpliVity, Maxta, Nimboxx, Pivot3, Scale Computing, NetApp, DataCore and Vmware. Another company with HCI aspirations is Microsoft, which entered the HCI space in late 2016 when it made its datacenter OS, Windows Server 2016, generally available. “Hyperconverged infrastructure is a key part of our Windows Server 2016 software-defined strategy spanning software-defined compute, storage, network and assurance,” noted Siddhartha Roy, principal group program manager for high availability and storage in Windows Server. “The converged systems market expanded on multiple fronts, most notably within hyperconverged solutions,” said IDC’s Eric Sheppard, research director, Enterprise Storage & Converged Systems. “While hyperconvergence is not the sole source of market growth, it has undeniably driven an expansion of this market into new environments at a very rapid pace.” 451 Research predicts the HCI market will expand at a compound annual growth rate (CAGR) of 41% through 2020 to just under $6 billion, while Technology Business Research estimated that the...

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