Dell Security Aims To Be One Step Ahead
Dec08

Dell Security Aims To Be One Step Ahead

It’s still too early to talk about Dell EMC’s security plans, said Brett Hansen, VP, Endpoint Data Security and Management, Dell, but he tells IT Trends & Analysis there is a lot of work going on behind the scenes on the future of the company’s post-merger enterprise security strategy. “I’m like a kid in the candy store with this acquisition.” What’s not to be excited about? Cybersecurity is getting a lot more attention — and customer budgets — and the acqusition brings together two sets of technology assets, skills and customer bases. While overall IT spending may be inching upward, security is expected to grow at a compound annual growth rate of 8.3% through 2020, from $73.6 billion in 2016 to more than $100 billion. Other estimates put this year’s cybersecurity spend at $122.45 billion, and a 10.6% CAGR to $202.36 billion by 2021. EMC’s former security division, RSA (with more than 30,000 customers), will retain its autonomy, but will benefit from being part of the world’s largest privately controlled technology company, said president Amit Yoran in a September conference call. “RSA is now part of the broader Dell Technologies – a much broader platform that allows us to make decisions along private company timelines and horizons for a more strategic perspective, and less maniacally focused on the 90-day public company window,” he stated. “There is a natural upside [for enterprises] of having the broader ecosystem of Dell Technologies from a leveraging relationships standpoint.” He said authentication and identity, advanced security operations and analytics, and the business context and business drivers around those will continue to be the three key areas that RSA is focusing on. As for the unit’s R&D focus, he said in a world where there is no longer any perimeter, being able to identify who is where on what and provide them the appropriate access with strong multi-factor authentication and an elegant user experience “is a key area where RSA has great capability and we will continue to invest aggressively in R&D in that area”. In addition, it is investing heavily in advanced security operations, which includes RSA’s endpoint threat detection and response product Ecat, the NetWitness suite, and all the analytics around those. “Ultimately, context matters most to the organisation. What is mission-critical, what is business-critical, what is required from a compliance and regulatory perspective, and ensuring that the limited security resources are being spent on the most impactful and critical things for the enterprise,” said Yoran. In June, prior to the acquisition’s close, EMC announced the findings from its global enterprise backup survey, ‘Are You Protected?’, which included: -incidents of traditional data loss...

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Has Dell Got The Winning Ticket To The DT Sweepstakes?

A significantly larger and much deeper-in-debt Dell has packed up the inaugural Dell EMC World event — 8,000 attendees — and will hold DEW2 next May in Sin City (or as I call it, Lost Wages). With the just-completed acquisition of EMC, the new enterprise business, Dell EMC, is the largest enterprise storage and server vendor, but while storage capacity and server unit shipments continue to soar, prices and margins continue to erode. In addition to the IT industry’s largest debt load, Dell added significant resources in enterprise storage (EMC), virtualization (VMware), cloud (Virtustream, Pivotal and ECS), networking (SDN/NSX), all-in-one appliances (VCE) and security (RSA). The company also has investments in 150 companies for future technologies. It moved into top spot in server shipments for the most recent quarter, while EMC tied for first place with HPE ($1.6 billion each) in enterprise storage, with Dell in third place. In total, Dell claims leadership in 20 Gartner Magic Quadrants, but where is the growth and profitability going to come from? At DEW 1.0, the company called out digital transformation (DT or DX) as its future, while beefing up its present with a variety of cloud, appliance, analytics, security and flash announcements. “I say we’re going to be the trusted provider of essential infrastructure for the next industrial revolution,” said Michael Dell in his keynote. We’re facing “the sunrise of a new era… digital dawn” and the opportunities are huge, he added. Or as GE’s CIO put it in a video at the show: “You go to bed an industrial company and wake up as a software and analytics company.” Technology is undergoing sweeping changes as a result of cloud, analytics, software-defined everything, Internet of Things, mobile and social, and these technologies/applications are helping to drive the digital transformation impacting every aspect of our lives. Dell is now the biggest enterprise IT vendor offering the broadest portfolio of hardware, software and services, while its two closest competitors fall further behind. IBM continues to struggle with growth while HPE continues to struggle with its smaller-is-more-agile-and-therefore-more-relevant philosophy. “At Dell EMC World you’re getting a look at the next great technology company,” said Dell. David Goulden, President and Chief Commercial Officer, Dell EMC, believes the company has first-mover status in both the datacenter consolidation currently driving the enterprise IT market, and in the emerging digital transformation. He also believes Dell is best-positioned because of its size and breadth. “We don’t see many customers say I want more partners.” They want fewer, more capable IT partners, not a bunch of point product vendors. He calls Dell EMC and its DT focus “a game changer.” Other...

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Cloud Highlights Dell EMC World
Oct19

Cloud Highlights Dell EMC World

Austin, Texas: A number of announcements were made at the inaugural Dell EMC World event (as well as VMWorld Europe), including a several cloud-related items. While not necessarily more significant or relevant than the other news, I decided to focus on the cloud items because cloud seemed to offer more perspective about Dell’s future, than its present. Dell’s Elastic Cloud Storage (formerly Project Nile), acquired with EMC, is a software-defined, cloud-based distributed file and object storage platform that manages data as objects. While it’s market segment represents an attractive solution for soaring data growth, it is not seeing corresponding growth, according to a study released at the start of the year. The ‘object storage market gains remained lackluster,’ although that should change: the ‘increased pressure on the storage infrastructure to scale bigger, protect longer, and keep more data active in more locations will likely continue to drive IT organizations to seek to deploy an architecture that can cost-effectively solve not only the scale challenges of today, but also those of the next decade or two in the future. For many organizations that architecture is object storage.’ Fast forward 9 months and following “good momentum”, Dell is making five ECS announcements, including software and enterprise enhancements, an appliance, and a single-tenant version due out later this year. While the announcements will appeal to existing customers, the intent is to grow the customer base, said Varun Chhabra, Director of Product Marketing for Dell EMC Emerging Tech Team. We’re “growing really fast,” he told IT Trends & Analysis. While the news should appeal to both existing and new customers, the “focus still remains on continuing to penetrate new accounts.” Given its position, Dell would seem to have nowhere to go but up. Chhabra said their goal is to equip customers on their journey to the cloud, wherever they may be. “We have to continue to innovate to provide customers that value.” It’s all about enabling choice for customers, and continuing to innovate, he added. Earlier this month VMware and Amazon Web Services announced a strategic partnership under which VMware’s software-defined data center (SDDC) offering will run on the AWS public cloud in mid-2017. With VMware Cloud on AWS (the new platform), customers will be able to run applications across VMware vSphere-based private, public and hybrid cloud environments using their existing VMware software and tools for a full range of storage, database, analytics and other services. “We see that we could bring together the best of both worlds,” said VMware CEO Pat Gelsinger. “The best of public cloud and the best of private cloud are coming together.” Earlier this year the company unveiled...

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Dell 3.0 Takes Center Stage at DEW

Austin, Texas:  The critical question arising from the inaugural Dell EMC World event — at least for me, an IBM, HP/E and Dell/EMC/VMware investor — is what makes Dell’s prospects any brighter than those of its two main competitors, IBM and HPE, and the trio of enterprise vendors offering more limited portfolios — Cisco, Oracle and Lenovo? IBM has seen its sales shrink for the last 17 quarters, HPE is just shrinking, and the other contenders can only offer partial solutions — predominantly networking and datacenter servers, DBMS software and appliances, and devices, respectively. From its humble roots in Michael Dell’s college dorm room, the company has scaled the PC heights, added servers, storage, software, networking, security and services and, with the completion of the EMC acquisition, is now grappling with the IT industry’s largest acquisition and largest debt load. It has also added significant resources in enterprise storage (disk, flash and software-defined), virtualization (VMware), cloud (Virtustream, Pivotal and ECS), networking (SDN/NSX), all-in-one appliances (VCE) and security (RSA). Of course there is a lot of overlap too, and while the combined companies may point out the differences, many others will be concerned about the similarities. We’ve already seen signs of tighter focus — i.e. the sales of the enterprise content division, services and software units, and the (lower-than-expected) SecureWorks IPO — and the first workforce reductions, 2,000-3,000 jobs are expected to be cut, out of 140,000. On the good (?) news front, Dell moved into top spot in server shipments for the most recent quarter, while HPE held on to top spot in revenues; shipments grew 2% year-over-year, while revenues edged 0.8% lower. Even better, EMC was named a leader in integrated systems, and the acquisition should strengthen that position, although Gartner cautions that uncertainty will plague the new Dell-EMC-VMware combination that brings ‘multiple overlapping and competing integrated system strategies under one roof.’ The results were equally ambivalent for enterprise storage, where revenue was flat while shipped capacities shot up 12.9%; EMC tied for first place with HPE ($1.6 billion each) while Dell came in third place with a revenue increase of 14%, up to $1 billion. Prior to the acquisition EMC was pushing a software-defined everything strategy, and it’s unlikely that focus will change under new ownership. The current evolution of IT is offering customers a couple of choices in pursuit of shrinking data centers, lower CAPEX and OPEX and the ability to leverage the cloud: some form of do it yourself versus an all-in-one solution, and hardware versus software lock-in (and that at the end of the day, there’s no getting away from software lock-in), Manuvir Das,...

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Cybersecurity Goes Private: McAfee and RSA

There are some interesting industry dynamics going on in the cybersecurity market. Just a few months ago, Symantec bought Blue Coat, taking a private company public and forming a cybersecurity industry colossus in the process. Now two other historical cybersecurity powerhouses are heading in the other direction and going private. When the Dell/EMC deal was approved this week, industry veteran RSA became the security division of the world’s largest diversified private technology company. Not to be outdone, Intel and partner TPG are spinning out McAfee as an independent private company. To read the complete article, CLICK...

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