CA: Connecting the DoTs

To help address the emerging multi-trillion-dollar app-driven digital transformation business phenomenon, CA Technologies made more than 20 new and enhanced product announcements at CA World ‘17. That might seem like a lot, but not when you consider that even after decades of consolidating and rationalizing its software portfolio, the ISV still lists 192 separate products on its website (courtesy of the approximately 70 companies acquired since opening its doors as Computer Associates back in 1976). While its efforts to expand the non-mainframe portion of its business — 65% of total revenues last quarter — seem to be taking longer than expected, CA’s emphasis on four pillars, or what Ayman Sayed, President & Chief Product Officer, called patterns — 1-making the products simpler to use and driving faster time to value; 2-SaaS availability; 3-openness, i.e. any infrastructure, any platform; and 4-AI — figured prominently in the innovation onslaught. Innovation was repeated often in the keynotes and one-on-ones. ”Most everyone in our industry is operationally efficient… but that’s not enough,” said CA CEO Mike Gregoire. “Our job is to break down barriers between technology and innovation,” referring to the event’s ‘No Barriers’ theme. Whether it’s built internally or bought, the company’s promise “and the holy grail” is to take innovation, integrate it with its other offerings and make it a “force multiplier”, he said. The innovations were intended to help address some of the impacts customers are confronting, he said. There has been a shift from building products to providing and supporting business outcomes. Customers are also demanding more intelligence, and security is becoming a bigger concern and a challenge, he added. Customers were another focus for CA, and as important as the announcements were, the “most exciting” news were the “170 customers joining us to talk about using our products to transform themselves,” said Sayed. Then he talked about the products, including the company’s latest artificial intelligence initiatives. CA combined the up and coming technology with its mainframe roots with solutions that ‘help customers speed time to resolution by 5X, reduce insider threats and cut operational expenses by 25%.’ “Through A.I. and machine-learning powered intelligent automation, CA’s new mainframe solutions enable increased insights across broader sets of data,” said CA’s Ashok Reddy, GM, Mainframe, in a prepared statement. It’s not a new concept or term, but as part of its security focus CA is pushing the concept of DevSecOps. In announcing new tools that integrate security throughout the software development lifecycle, Sayed said this approach is “critically important”, and the tools are now available across the company’s Automic, Veracode, and Continuous Delivery portfolios. “Companies that embrace DevSecOps deliver better and...

Read More

Time to Embrace a Security Management Plane in the Cloud

There’s an old saying that change is the enemy of security. To avoid disruptive changes, many cybersecurity professionals strive for tight control of their environment and this control extends to the management of security technologies. Experienced cybersecurity professionals often opt to install management servers and software on their networks so that management and staff “owns” their technologies and can control everything they can. To read the complete article, CLICK...

Read More
Cisco AMPs Up Security From Datacenter To Endpoint
Nov10

Cisco AMPs Up Security From Datacenter To Endpoint

Having successfully targeted and gone on to dominate the networking and datacenter server markets, Cisco has set its sights on security, and from a new marketing slogan to its latest end-point protection product and pricing announcements, the company is committed to dominating this market too. “The two things that I think are going to be most important: Number one is security … and then moving fast in innovating over and over,” said Cisco CEO Chuck Robbins. Over the years, Cisco has mastered the art of using market transitions to capture share, and it appears it is well on its way to doing so in the security market, said Zeus Kerravala, founder and principal analyst of ZK Research. The market transition that’s changing security is digital transformation. Digital businesses need to move with speed and be agile, but they also must be secure, but the traditional security model in most companies doesn’t allow this, he noted. Earlier this year the company changed its brand promise to: ‘We securely connect everything to make anything possible.’ Robbins added “securely” to the sentence, and the security team is now involved in virtually everything Cisco does. Security-by-design is the standard, he said. With its primary revenue generator, networking, under attack, and a slowdown in its formerly high-flying UCS and HCI server sales, security has been a bright spot. “Cisco is making good progress and achieving strong results along the way,” blogged Jon Oltsik, Senior Principal Analyst and the founder of Enterprise Strategy Group’s cybersecurity service, and is executing accordingly to take their [along with IBM] cybersecurity businesses to $5 billion and beyond. The company’s security business is now at a $2 billion run rate, doubling its AMP for Endpoint customers from 8,000 in November 2015 to 17,000 as of August 2016. It was Cisco’s largest growth area (up 16% year over year) during its recent fiscal fourth quarter, to $540 million, the third straight quarter of double-digit revenue growth. This growth comes at a good time, because while spending may be inching upward when it comes to overall IT budgets, security is expected to grow at a compound annual growth rate of 8.3% through 2020, from $73.6 billion in 2016 to more than $100 billion. Other estimates put this year’s cybersecurity spend at $122.45 billion, and a 10.6% CAGR to $202.36 billion  by 2021. If the cybersecurity market has been looking good to Cisco, the endpoint security market, which is ripe for disruption, could be even more attractive. “In 2016, IDC expects security start-ups to continue to penetrate the enterprise endpoint security market segment as enterprises seek innovative solutions to detect ransomware and targeted...

Read More

The gold standard for data protection keeps evolving

Yes, of course, data protection has to evolve to keep up with how production platforms are evolving, but I would offer that the presumptive ‘gold standard’ for what is the norm for those on the front lines of proactive data protection is evolving in at least three different directions at the same time. Here is a 3-minute video on what we are seeing and what you should be thinking about as the evolutions continue. To read the complete article, CLICK...

Read More
Reinmaker: Cisco Collars Skyrocketing Shadow IT
Jan13

Reinmaker: Cisco Collars Skyrocketing Shadow IT

Shadow IT (AKA cockroach technology) – when business units (and/or individuals) buy, own and operate IT resources with little or no assistance from the IT group – is apparently far more pervasive than enterprises suspect, but fortunately Cisco is charging to the rescue. The company has unveiled Cloud Consumption as a Service, a software as a service (SaaS) that discovers and continually monitors cloud usage across an organization and delivers detailed analysis and benchmarking. Shadow IT has been an issue for years, but according to new data from Cisco, it’s a much bigger concern than anybody is aware of. New analysis reveals the average large enterprise uses 1,220 individual cloud services, which is up to 25 times more than estimated by IT. The average number of cloud services has grown 112% over the past year (i.e. more than doubled), and 67% over the past six months. Cisco has been providing cloud monitoring services for a couple of years, said Bob Dimicco, Senior Director, Advanced Services, Cisco, and has been using the SaaS service internally for the last 12 months. “What’s new is we’re taking the software tool that we’ve been using for a couple of years… out from under professional services, to a standalone product.” Hosted in Cisco’s cloud, the company’s IT group has been using it for well over a year, he told IT Trends & Analysis. He said some of the company’s best practices are based upon what they’ve found to be useful. It’s about embracing Shadow IT, enabling choice, but appropriately. The cloud can provide a number of benefits, but there are also a number of risks, said Dimicco, including: -Business Continuity: 26% of providers have a very high/high risk of ceasing operations in 12 months; -Data Protection: customers discover 44 high risk cloud services on average; -Compliance: 60% of the top 100 cloud services are subject to 4 major regulatory areas; -Costs: hidden costs 4-8X higher than billed costs, redundant services; and, -SLA Performance. According to Gartner, Shadow IT has a significant slice of the IT investment pie, and that slice is only going to get bigger. “Shadow IT investments often exceed 30% of total IT spend,” said Matt Cain, research VP, Gartner. “This will only increase because demand for new apps and services to pursue digital opportunities outstrips the capacity of IT to provide them. At the same time, cloud services will mature and employee demographics will shift to increasingly technically savvy employees frustrated by the pace of traditional IT, and with the skills to find their own IT solutions.” “Organizations that formally embrace and extend the digital competencies of their employees will experience...

Read More