…Addressing the Hybrid Cloud Security Readiness Gap

Over the last few months, some established cybersecurity brands have made strategic moves while emerging market leaders have announced compelling capabilities and initiatives. This notable level of industry activity is indicative of an acceleration of market maturity driven by a cloud security readiness gap. That is, most IT and cybersecurity teams are catching up to secure the cloud services, applications, and infrastructure, their organization is already using, and to do so, they are retooling their processes, policies, skills, and technologies. Click here to read the rest of this blog on CSHub.com. To read the complete article, CLICK...

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Where Endpoint Management and Security Meet

Upgrade existing tools or net new platform investments? This is the question IT operations and information security teams are wrestling with as they attempt to secure an expanding perimeter driven by cloud, mobile, and IoT. Should companies maintain a traditional siloed tool approach or embrace a modern management approach that unifies management and security policies across users, devices, applications, networks, and data? The ultimate goal is to deliver a secure workspace by authenticating users across devices and enforcing policies based on location, device type, application, data, and the security posture of the end-user. This seems simple enough, but given the stress mobility, cloud, and IoT are putting on IT and security pros and the market dynamics ESG is observing with endpoint management and security vendors, business are finding themselves in a quandary. The one constant for businesses is change as more devices, applications, and innovative ideas continue to pour in, but these leave IT operations and security teams with the challenge of answering: To read the complete article, CLICK...

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Artificial Intelligence and Machine Learning…

The traction over the last few years in the artificial intelligence (AI) and machine learning (ML) space is remarkable, and I’m not just talking about consumer-based products like self-driving cars, or virtual assistants like Google Assistant, Alexa, or Siri. While those products get the headlines, AI/ML is rapidly spreading across the enterprise IT space. I feel like I can’t go a day without a company mentioning AI or ML as part of their product or forward-looking strategy. It’s not just for crazy, sci-fi predictive analytics projects in a bunker somewhere. While that definitely still happens, AI and ML (and deep learning too) are being used across all aspects of IT: big data, cloud, IoT, security, infrastructure, systems management, etc.While AI/ML is a top priority for businesses that expect it to have a significant (positive) business impact as they continue to digitally transform, investments remain modest because of its sheer impact on all aspects of the infrastructure. Challenges associated with infrastructure cost, lack of in-house expertise, and insufficient data quality are just the start. To read the complete article, CLICK...

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Has Cisco Got The Right Stuff?
Feb01

Has Cisco Got The Right Stuff?

John Chambers, who handed control of Cisco to Chuck Robbins in July 2015, was bumped further upstairs a month ago when he became Chairman Emeritus, while his successor took over his role as Chairman of the Board, but more than a change in leadership, the turnover represents a new — and hopefully — improved networking, server and security vendor. The company, which has been struggling with the cloud and commodity hardware and software-based competitors for the last decade, looks poised for new life — and growth — as it hosts this week’s Cisco Live EMEA 2018, in Barcelona, Spain. Reinventing Cisco is not new. “We’re probably reinvented ourselves five or six times literally in the last two decades alone,” said Chambers shortly after moving up to the board. In an industry famous for it’s what-have-you-done-for-me-next philosophy, networking has been battered by explosive demands, increasing complexity and flat budgets, with the results that Cisco’s market domination has been mired in commodity hell. In Q3 its Ethernet switching business grew 7.4% year-over-year to $6.75 billion (56.7% market share), while the router market climbed 3% to 41.4%, up slightly sequentially (40.8%), but down year-over-year (44%). While networking accounts for the bulk of Cisco’s revenues, it’s been doing pretty well in the datacenter market with its server portfolio (i.e. UCS and HyperFlex), statistically tied with IBM for third place in 3Q17, with 5.8% of the market ($992 million), behind HPE (19.5%) and Dell (18.1%). Cisco also did very well in the converged systems market, and while it’s a much smaller segment, $2.99 billon vs $17 billon in Q3, the company held down second place between Dell (48.3%) and HPE (10.3% share, down 41.9% from a year-ago’s 18.1%), and grew its marketshare 56.4% YoY to $485.5 million. Security is another market where Cisco is growing strongly. Cybersecurity spending is expected to soar from last year’s $137.85 billion to $231.94 billion by 2022, at a Compound Annual Growth Rate (CAGR) of 11.0%. According to ESG cybersecurity guru Jon Oltsik, “Cisco is one of only a handful of $2 billion-plus cybersecurity vendors that can grow its security revenue to over $5 billion by 2020.” At 4% of total revenues, the company’s security business is never going to be more than a wagging tail, but it grew 13% YoY in 2016, and 12% in the first nine months of 2017, which is way better than the switch and router business. A week ago Cisco expanded its cybersecurity portfolio with the acquisition of Skyport — a privately held company that has secured approximately $70 million in funding — whose core product platform is SkySecure Server, a physical server...

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IBM’s… Back to Kicking Butt

I’m ex-IBM myself and it gives me great pleasure to see my old firm do well. Well this quarter they didn’t disappoint with significant improvement in their new business initiatives, which are just short of 50 percent of revenue. You remember the mainframe, that platform that supposedly was dead back in the 1980s? Well, once again IBM showcased there is evidently life after death because that puppy grew more than a whopping 70 percent year over year. Let’s talk about IBM’s results and why IBM, after 100 years, is again able to perform at the top of their class. To read the complete article, CLICK HERE NOTE: This column was originally published in the Pund-IT...

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