…Infrastructure Compatibility and VMware Cloud on AWS

Much of the discussion when it comes to moving workloads from on-premises data centers to cloud infrastructure-as-a-service (IaaS) is about the need to lift and shift VMs. The problem is that much of the discussion is about what happens after the lift and shift, in terms of the operational and cost-side of running VMs in IaaS. What has been missing is the discussion of how to get those VMs into the cloud in the first place. I can always easily tell who has actually attempted the shift and who hasn’t by asking them about the difficulties of converting on-premises VMs to cloud VMs. If the company gets into details about all the different conversion options (data migration, VM conversions, compatible hypervisors) and the issues around each, then I know they have actually made the conversion attempt. It’s no wonder that companies that are looking at leveraging cloud resources in a hybrid cloud configuration value infrastructure compatibility. I’ve been writing about these types of configurations for several years. In my 2017 Hybrid Cloud study, I asked companies the question “What is or likely will be the main objective of your organization’s hybrid cloud strategy?” The most commonly cited answer was common infrastructure compatibility, with 31% of respondents. In the same study, 91% of companies expect to have at least half their applications and workloads on-premises in five years. Only 7% said they expected most, if not all, of their workloads will run in the cloud in five years. With this need for on-premises infrastructure compatibility, it’s no wonder that the AWS VMware Cloud on AWS solution from VMware has been gaining momentum. It’s a pairing of the dominant on-premises hypervisor in VMware with the leading public cloud IaaS provider in Amazon Web Services. VMware Cloud on AWS is vSphere running directly on Amazon EC2 elastic, bare-metal infrastructure, along with vSAN for storage and NSX for networking. This solution is the purest form of infrastructure compatibility between on-premises and cloud, running the VMware solution within the AWS data centers, which results in a cloud IaaS environment that is compatible with the on-premises infrastructure at both the VM and management level. This is one of the easiest ways for on-premises VMware customers to get into the cloud, with little or no conversion, yet still have high bandwidth, low latency access to cloud services from AWS. VMware recently made several new announcements about VMware Cloud on AWS, including: To read the complete article, CLICK...

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VMware Wants To ‘Cloudify’ 500k vSphere Customers
Oct15

VMware Wants To ‘Cloudify’ 500k vSphere Customers

Barcelona should be rocking this week, what with VMworld Europe (October 12-15), and the news that Dell intends to acquire EMC, which owns 81% of VMware. So an announcement that vRealize, VMware’s hybrid cloud management platform, is getting a makeover, can easily get lost in the noise. Due to ship later this quarter, VMware vRealize Automation and vRealize Business Standard are now sporting shiny new release numbers (7), but more importantly, they address some of the cloud issues confronting a half-million vSphere users.. “The last couple of years people were playing at this (cloud management) at various levels,” said Sajai Krishnan, VP of Product Marketing, Management Suites Business Unit, VMware. Now the market would like to know what their true costs are, he told IT Trends & Analysis. VMware is one of the leaders in cloud management, he said, and the new releases incorporate the three elements of a cloud management platform: automation, operations and business. vRealize Automation makes it easier for teams to automate the lifecycle of infrastructure and application resources, while vRealize Business makes it easier to understand the cost of infrastructure services. While these are upgrades, and should appeal to vRealize users, Krishnan believers the biggest upside is outside this segment. “The good news is with over 500,000 customers with vSphere… we can seek them out”. “It’s very easy for vSphere customers to carve out portions of their infrastructure that they want to ‘cloudify’.” He said new customers are coming off the sidelines as they look for agility through automation. We get them enough choice to address agility without losing sight of security, he added. One of the big challenges of networking and security is that it is a very mix-and-match business with a lot of room for error, said Krishnan. “This helps to avoid that by bringing in automation…” Everything cloud is getting increasing attention, and hybrid is no exception. According to one report, the hybrid cloud market will be worth just under $90 billion by 2019, a Compound Annual Growth Rate (CAGR) of 27.3% from $25.28 billion in 2014. A more recent IDC study puts total worldwide spending on cloud IT infrastructure – i.e. servers, storage and Ethernet switches – will top $32.6 billion for the year, a 24% increase on last year’s total. Public cloud spending will increase by 29.6% year-over-year, while private cloud will rise by 15.8%. Non-cloud infrastructure spending will drop by 1.6% in 2015, to $66.8 billion. IDC forecasts that cloud IT infrastructure spending will grow at a CAGR of 15.1%, hitting $53.1 billion by 2019, giving it a 46% share of the market overall. Public cloud will account for...

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One OpenStack to Rule Them All: Bare Metal to Clouds

At VMworld 2014, VMware announced its easy-to-install OpenStack distribution, VMware Integrated OpenStack. This got me thinking, as normally OpenStack refers not just to the OpenStack distribution but to a specific underlying hypervisor as well, usually KVM. However, we know that OpenStack works equally well on KVM, vSphere, Hyper-V, and Xen, as it is more of a cloud management layer than a hypervisor. We should probably never lose sight of that little aspect of OpenStack: it is not a hypervisor. As an open-source management stack, it is possible for it to manage cross-hypervisor with a few modifications to its components. To read the complete article, CLICK HERE NOTE: This column was originally published in The Virtualization Practice...

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Will Docker and VMware Compete?

Docker and VMware vSphere both allow the running of multiple applications on one physical server. However, the similarities end there. Docker is more likely to focus on meeting the emerging needs of the DevOps community than to go back and build all of the data center management pieces that make VMware the market-leading data center management platform. To read the complete article, CLICK...

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The Face of the New Backup

Backup, disaster recovery, and business continuity have changed quite a bit over the years, and they will continue to change into the future as more capability, analytics, and functionality are added to the general family of data protection tools. As we launch ourselves into the clouds, we need to perhaps rethink how we do data protection, what tools are available for data protection, and how to use our older tools to accomplish the same goals. We need an integrated data protection plan that not only accounts for cloud or data center failures but also accounts for the need to run within the cloud. There is always the need to get your data there and back again. Solving this problem has been an interesting quest for many. I have seen parts of it solved by many, but few have the entire picture covered. Here is an entire picture of a possible backup scenario: To read the complete article, CLICK HERE NOTE: This column was originally published in The Virtualization Practice...

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